Thursday, November 06, 2008

Interesting Tidbit

World polls on the election showed that three countries -- Georgia, Israel and the Philippines -- favored John McCain. The Economist had the Philippines down as going 70% for McCain. One can look at this as either the glass half-full or half-empty. After 40 years of persistent struggle against imperialism, 70% remains mired in colonial racist mentality. Or one can say that at least 30% are in some "liberated zone" mentally. Sorry, it's a country of "at leasts."

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Being a Canadian-Filipino myself, I am very disturbed to find that Filipinos support McCain. Did Arroyo strengthen anew the right-wing American hegemony on the country? Are the people begging for the days of colonialism again? I am deeply disturbed. I honestly did not expect such numbers. Colonial racist mentality was a term I learned early from my dad who was a student in the University of the Philippines and an activist during the Marcos regime. Maybe just maybe hope for a healing change can begin with a man who spent his childhood years in an Asian country that was also victim to American imperialism who is now it's Commander in Chief.

Anonymous said...

I'm not refuting Ms. Rosca's claim. I'm just dabbling on the web for numbers because the blog entry got me curious.

One website I found was economist.com. The website said Philippines was 88% for Obama according to its Global Electoral College. Numbers are tricky.

Nonetheless, a quick search on the Web shows a disturbing antipathy for Obama from the Philippines. One of the issues that first appear when "Obama" and "Philippines" appear is outsourcing. Outsourcing is another factor why Philippine's economy is stagnant and not a solution to the country's anti-development state.

Ninotchka Rosca said...

The 70% number was forwarded to me by someone who wanted my response to it. Frankly, I'd be shocked if it were 88% for Obama. I barely found a Filipino Democrat in my roaming through New York, which is Democrat country. On the other hand, The New York Times identifies the Philippines as being in the same political realm as Israel and Georgia. But thanks for the information. And please,I welcome refutation, especially on this issue, as it will help, to use Obama's words, vindicate my faith in my home country.

Ninotchka Rosca said...

Also,Gallup Polls has the Philippines up for McCain. Strangely enough, it's territory outside Manila which went stronger for McCain -- Visayas and Mindanao.

Anonymous said...

Barely a Filipino Democrat? Not even in New York?

I'm from Canada. O.K. I'm the same person who commented first on this entry-maybe I should set up my own blog so I wouldn't have to keep leaving anonymous comments. Well, to be honest, I'm not familiar with the climate of the Filipino community here-a main reason being the crab mentality, heck if there could be a political cartoon of the Philippine Diaspora it would be crabs in a bucket. Anyways, why is there a lack of support for Obama from Filipinos-America and the Philippines? Is it because he's a Democrat? Is it plain apathy from Filipinos about politics? I'm afraid I must be complacently living under a rock on Neptune. What is going on with the political climate in the Philippines? Why does the Philippines support McCain? I'm quite baffled.

Ninotchka Rosca said...

I'd been involved in a running debate on a Filipino listserve for about three months until election day, my goodness. Frankly, I'd never read as much racist stuff in my life. Made me think that I too must have been living in Neptune. If you send me your email address, I won't make it public but can direct you to several non-crab mentality Pinoy organizations in Canda.

Anonymous said...

I remember reading, Yellow: Race in America Beyond Black and White by Frank Wu. Wu mentioned that there is a disturbing rift between the African Americans and Asian Americans. Wu gave gave some possible reasons for the rift. One example he gave was Asian business people have been creating a monopoly in areas with a high Black population. Wu also points out fear from Blacks when Asians hear violent lyrics about them from rap music due to these monopolies. There is also the "niggah" example he gave which illustrates the communication barrier between Black and Asian communities is not just due to language. Of coarse, the examples he gave were not specific to any one particular Asian ethnicity because if there's a "race" more fractured and diverse it's Asian, right?

What I hope to get from Obama's presidency is a paradigm shift from race being a black and white and black versus white issue. Racism affects all people and is another form of social stratification that weakens us from resisting imperialism. Obama's win I hope is not just a victory for the African-American community, it's a victory for all people of color, a victory for women of color, a victory for bringing a new vision of equality into modernity.

I think now's the time for Asian leaders in America to speak up and possibly build stronger relations with the African American community. I believe Wu devoted an entire chapter to the idea of the power of coalitions. Now, that a minority group has the potential to wield an international forum maybe this is the time for all minorities to unite. Am I being overly naive and idealistic? Well, I think the Asian-American community and the African-American community can only stand to gain from forming an alliance in their quest for human rights. Let's not forget it Asians had crucial but often neglected part in the growth of America and Canada. Today, Asians continue to make important contributions to America and have even become North America's most coveted commodity. Maybe it's time for an Asian narrative to the story of racism in America.

yssi said...

Hmm, not surprised, partly because Filipinos in the Philippines seem to think they're better than black people. But where exactly did the Economist poll in the Philippines? Wondering. But yeah... we did exit interviews at a poll site in JC and most of the Filipinos said they voted for McCain

Anonymous said...

What worries me is it seems Filipinos support a political candidate not for his/her political merit. They are only judging a man by the color of his skin........

There's just so many questions I have now and so many ways to interpret Filipino's behavior during the elections. Maybe it was only the Filipinos interested in politics and voted that support McCain? It just kills me to think that race alone is why Filipinos hate Obama. Race alone is why no one as taken interest in the narrative of Asian's plight in U.S.A. The ordeal just doesn't make sense to me even though it happened and it is happening.

J said...

Baka rin ayaw lang talaga ng Pinoy sa mga African-Americans.